Stanislav Gres

Harpsichord

  • Copy of Blanchet by Bruce Kennedy 2013

For cellists or violinists it is self-evident to know their instruments inside and out and are, therefore, able to create a perfect, unique sound – a beautiful synergy of the artist and their instrument that is often neglected when it comes to keyboard instruments. For that particular reason, Stanislav Gres likes to travel with the NeoBarock-harpsichord, a copy of a big double-manual instrument by Bruce Kennedy, as long as spatial distance allows for it.

Born in Novosibirsk (Siberia), Stanislav begun his piano studies in Novosibirsk Glinka Conservatory. His deep fascination for the historically informed performance practice of the music from the XVI-XX centuries drove him to the postgraduate studies in Moscow Tchaikovsky Conservatoire, where he studied the harpsichord and the early fortepiano with Olga Martynova, and in the Hochschule für Künste Bremen, where he mastered the chamber music art with Carsten Lohff. The other inspirations for his professional development were coming from master classes with the world’s leading early keyboard performers such as Gustav Leonhardt, Skip Sempé, Ketil Haugsand, Élisabeth Joyé and Christopher Stembridge.

Stanislav has taught the harpsichord in Gnessin Specialized Music School and in Rubinstein Music School in Moscow, where he also established the first private harpsichord school in Russia. For years he was an official harpsichord tuner at the Piccola Accademia di Montisi and has taken a short apprenticeship in the harpsichord workshop of Bruce Kennedy.

In 2010 he was awarded the third prize in the international harpsichord competition “Musica Antiqua” in Brugge and the Baerenreiter Urtext Prize in the Bach competition in Leipzig. With profound knowledge of sources and interpretational imagination, he gives solo harpsichord recitals and is also in demand as a chamber music partner. Since 2017 Stanislav Gres lives in Germany, where he got the position of solo and continuo harpsichordist at the internationally renowned ensemble NeoBarock. He enriches the ensemble with his experience and skills, and especially with his new ideas. His sonorous and imaginative play turns the harpsichord into an equal musical partner, and into the foundation of the characteristic NeoBarock sound.